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america in this age of all. language and is most molecular form, its identity, that is nothing more than the memory and that we have the their experience store passed down to us from people in our tribe that experienced that it. it is the root and of the focus of who we are. then what do we need from our leadership? that the idea of identity and provides aa distinct political character. that is one of the things we identified, they show this very clear the. first thing is that african-americans are the most liberal voting bloc in the country. . . very clear the. by city the most liberal city in the country is detroit and the most conservative city is somewhere in utah. so it's a function of the language of race is one of liberation. we want to be freed. so you see that sort of the political consciousness. now, one of the first things we see and we talk about this in the book the economic policy of black people this keynesian which means we see that government -- we see the government plays a role in economics. i haven't seen a pulled yet but i'd sure if there was one order is one out the
, not one of them is in cuba. can america's a that? while lee is watching, obama takes a step closer to the presidency and an african proverb comes to mind. one of his black countrymen often try to describe the dilemma in the post-apartheid era got a stone but not a not to crack, not a not a that no stone to correct it with. the south majority government built homes for the people what left them without money to pay the rent provide them with running water but shut off the top when they couldn't be the bill to replace the names of bullheaded white segregationists and the the schoolhouses with those of black liberation heroes but didn't replace the shoddy roofs. order companies to hire blacks but permitted them to slash wages. so it goes for the new south africa where a small white minority continues to inhabit a split country, splendid country that is for all intensive purposes canada while three-quarters of the population resides in the country with living conditions similar to those of kenya or zambia. it's almost as if black south africans vanquishing the partite only apply to the
tonight, they are older, they are whiter than america, and they eastern more money and are better educated. that's right. the tea party is made up of elite, well-off intellectuals of sorts who are out of step with the real america, and they are very deeply confused. 84% of them think their movement reflects the view of most americans, but 73% of them are conservative, while only 35% of the real america is. 92% wants smaller government with fewer services, which only 50% of the real america want. 39% of real america correctly blames president bush for most of the deficit. 6% of tea partiers do. half of the real america wants government spending to create jobs, which only 17% of tea partiers want. and while only 19% of the real america call themselves angry at washington, more than half of tea partiers do. which brings us neatly to today's tea party rally on the capitol. >> hey, you look happy to me. you don't look angry. that's because you get it. and you are smart enough to get off your couch and do something about it. so this november, what do you say? let's take back our country. how man
business everything is all about america they took to people was from kansas city, few. and before this building there was the union depot before it burned down so why have spent a lot of time in your town in my brain over the last few years. i think the easiest way for me to get you into the destroy all of this book and the idea we what we want to do is to for have imagery from the beginning of the book. so who the hell was fred harvey. on the spring night in 1980 to the trunk and cowboy is writing from northern mexico was in disbelief at the site of the montezuma hotel. it did appear to be a hallucination. montezuma was one of the most astonishing architectural creations in america perhaps most astonishing was its location. it was nestled in the gorgeous nowhere in the foothills of the mountains 6 miles outside of las vegas mexico would read this into a town of the real world only recently connected to civilization. the largest building in the united states between the style montezuma featured a dining room that seated 500, casino of breathtaking wine cellar, a bowling alley, bil
to be the rigid ideologue that he is. why would america expect anything other than than an extreme justice? would you want the republicans, if he appoints a radical left winger to oppose -- >> absolutely we will be engaged very closely, very effectively in this debate. this is an opportunity to change the direction of the court. i know a lot of folks want to lay this off, you are going to replace a liberal with a liberal that is not the idea this is the difference between a court that is going to focus on the rule of law and working that way or activist court that is going to try to legislate from the bench. the rnc will be prepared to fight any effort to put a left leaning activist judge on this court. >> sean: i think the crowd is happy about that. [ cheering ] >> sean: bart stupak -- by the way, i'm not going to pat myself on the back. i said from the beginning he would cave. i knew he would give in just as nelson was bought off. do you think he's afraid to run in this reelection? >> absolutely. because of these folks right here. [ cheering ] >> the people have been sending a signal for some t
and on the campaign trail even when you go out into america what passed for journalism was going to a donner. during iowa caucuses as opposed to knocking on doors so that's the kind of reporting jon and i have done over the years and that's the kind of -- that is kind of where we come from this. this book was sort of two years ago, i mean a year or so ago when barack obama was elected president there were a lot of teams hope, change and a number of other things. one of the things they were talking about, when we start talking about black people the discussion was black people think this and it was one black people terry talked about with him representing white people and black people think this. this book was meant to turn the camera the other way and look at the crowd and say who are these folks and what do they think and what they came up with a lot of different things. and so we've talked to union workers. we've talked to offenders and people who were business owners who don't want their taxes cut and so a lot of people have a lot of different opinions about the world. one of the chapters -- the
new york, good night america! >>> i'm gregg jarrett and welcome to a brand-new hour of america's news headquarters. >> the body of polish president now recovered from the wreckage of the plane crash that killed him and his wife and other high ranking officials. all 97 people died while the plane was trying to land. >> rescue crews are confirming there are no survivors after the bodies of four missing miners were discovered. new questions now surfacing whether the tragedy could have been prevented. >>> and a russian orphan at the center of a storm. russian officials threatening to stop all u.s. adoptions after a tennessee woman sends her son back to russia alone. >> gregg: but we began with news out of new orleans where the leadership conference. michael steele is expected to address the crowd in the next hour or so. also a bit later on, we're going to learn the results of the straw poll which will gauge support for nine potential candidates or contenders for the 2012 gop presidential nomination. carl cameron is live in new orleans. give us a rundown of what is going on there. >> behin
happen, could it? ♪ ♪ >> glenn: hello, america. by the way, washington, we're on to you and we're keeping an eye on what you're doing on thursday. i wouldn't miss tomorrow's episode. the hate is flowing in america. especially in arizona. oh, it's like do you remember from "ghost busters" i think it was "ghostbuster ii." there it is. the river of slime oozing underneath the surface infecting everything. hate boiling up. well, here is how representative jared pollis described the mood in arizona. arizona law is like nazi germany. it's absolutely reminiscent of second class status of jews in germany. prior to world wire ii when they had -- world war ii when they had to show their papers and had them with them all the time and suspect to routine inspections at the suspicious of being jewish. i fear arizona is headed for a police state. boy, i'm glad somebody said it! arizona sure is putting the a-z in "nazi" aren't they? i hate to rain on the hate parade, but can we slow down just a second here? and ask you're out of your mind. am i alone in that? you are out of your mind! are you comparing t
wally word. we pretty would bring an end to legalized plunder in america and we hang your mercy upon us to tour forcible some of our lord and savior jesus christ and his blessed name we pray amen. [cheering] ladies and gentlemen negative the leader of the online tax revolt. i want to introduce now someone most of us know mark william, his place is ringing out across the country for conservative principles and. mark is going to be helping introduce the great participants in the tea party expressed and other grass-roots today. mark, come up here and say a word. [cheering] >> wish me luck. i am on with joh this afternoon to follow up on the number one youtube hit. thank you for being here that t. purdy express comes and we started in nevada 27th. 25,000 people joined uso wish him every read a happy retirement. [cheering] moments ago the national press club we announced our endorsement and commitment of resources to elect nevada state legislators geren ingalls to replace harry reid. yesterday even though i live in boston, i live in california but my home state is boston. we were there with
of massachusetts for america. jericho you are doing all the hard work though. the only way this country gets fixed is if you do the work in the trenches. we can get you revved up and connected with people but at the end of the day it is organizing committee. it is keeping the hammer down with e-mails and letters and phone calls to restore a constitutional republic to the united states of america. [cheering] don't you dare let anyone tell you you are a racist, angry or are a mob. [cheering] we are a human rights movement. what we are doing is based on the united states constitution. [cheering] the i united states constitution sets up america as the only society in the history of mankind press on the idea that the only legitimate reason for government was to protect the individual civil liberties and rights of citizens. [cheering] it is impossible to be a racist, human rights advocate who anybody thinks the city its food and on the fringes what missiles lines have anything to do i have news for you, america is our country and we are taking it back to triet [cheering] all right. god, country, family.
of him? much more distancing of him at this point in time? >> black america is not going throw barack obama away. because they understand their own experience. and you look at the polls even today where there is skepticism, black america is not going to throw him away. they've been in this country too long and they understand -- they understand that some of the -- what's thrown at him is not legitimate. i'm not saying that's good thing. they may not be in their best interest to do but none of the polls so far suggest that black america is going to distance themselves in any real way from barack obama at this point. >> yeah. i agree with robert completely. i don't think you're ever going to see the black support for barack obama dip below -- certainly below 80%. but i do think this. i don't think if things continue the way they're going, and i think they're going to, i don't think they are going to turn out for him in the next election. and, you know, the -- our presidential elections are not that complicated. there's a few states. i'm from indiana. he won't win indiana -- if the vote
be said of fellow component bank of america. this has been marching right towards $20 where it hasn't been also since november 2008. both these companies were filled by the same sort, of that financial crisis. bank of america said to report before the bell, as well. we're looking for around 7:00 this morning for those numbers to come out. revenues of nearly $28 billion. and the shares, as we mentioned, they've been on a run, really pushing higher, up about 5% this week alone. coming up at 7:15 eastern time, we've got bank of america ceo brian noin na hamoynihan. because bank of america is the nation's largest bank, it tas talk to one of every two consumers. >> you're not doing business with bank of america? >> they bought my mortgage. >> but you don't -- that's not your bank? >> it's not where i have my deposits, but they own my mortgage, so i am doing business with them. >> well, then it's two out of two. >> but there's two other people at the table. maybe they have it. >> do you have bank of america? >> i think it's not bank of america. still, i have no deposits there and i don't know if
. we'll have more on the shutdown from london and iceland, coming up on "good morning america." >>> there's good news this morning for the hundreds of thousands whose unemployment benefits have run out. president obama signed a bill restoring those benefits. those who were getting checks can reapply and get the money they missed retroactively. >>> republicans say that unemployment bill adds $18 billion to the deficit. deficit and government spending were the subject of rallies of tea parties around the country. there were rallies demanding strict fiscal policies and an end to what some called gangster government. jonathan karl went to the rally in washington. >> reporter: they came to washington, angry about president obama's policies, to be sure. but also angry at the way they've been portrayed. >> we've been called racist. >> don't -- we've been called a lot of things we're not. >> the only thing we want is obama to be more conscious with our money and not be wasteful. that's it. doesn't make us racist. >> reporter: many of them blamed us, the news media. >> you know what, b
as their opportunity for unchallenged social experimentation. as i meet with you, the grassroots of america, i had never seen the kind of anger growing right now. [applause] smart people who study this kind of thing tallis that anger -- tell us that anger is usually a mask for fear. why do the citizens of the greatest nation on earth have reason to be fearful? it is because we love our country. we love the first principles of liberty and opportunity. we love the american dream. we want it for ourselves and for our children. this is the promised land. this is the place that people have always come to buy land, by sea, by hook or by crook. when people living under tyrants are secretly planning their escape, this land is the preferred destination. [applause] why is that? is it because our soil grows better corn? is it something in the water? are we just nicer here? if you have spent any time in rush hour traffic, you know that is not necessarily the case. america is supposed to be the place that you come to so that the tentacles of big government no longer reach you. this is the place where as long a
. with mandela and the king the fund inspiration from gandhi and the liberation hero. america's anti-apartheid movement was largely set in motion by black americans like randall robinson and south africa's afrikaners white settlers of dutch and french extraction who initiated the formal part by state or the spending architectural image of america's white southerners both groups invented full-court tales of how the conquer hostel play and and hostile dark skinned people delivering civilization, religion and technology to welcome savage. south africans translate the work colloquially as red neck. there's a popular story told in south africa perhaps. it goes like this, a white south africans traveled to the united states in the mid 80's and landed at o'hare international airport in chicago. at customs, a white american immigration officer summed silently to the south africans passport for a minute or two prompting the white south african traveller to ask the middle-aged officer if there was a problem. so your from south africa, the officer asked without looking up. his on-again, the tra
america to see. see, they're the base. they're old. they're angry. they're white. they're scared. they're misinformed. they watch fox. they live in the bullet-point culture. let me give you something real ease city to understand here tonight. if you're watching, you righties. barack obama has an "f" rating. meaning fail. suck. bad. an "f" rating from the brady campaign against gun violence. now, i want the informationally-challenged voters to listen very close to me when i say this tonight. that president obama does not want your gun, and i think you should understand that. he hasn't proposed a single thing that would infringe on your second-amendment rights. not one. not one thing. the more people that buy into this anti-government nonsense coming from the right, the cloclos cloclos closer we're going to get to another oklahoma city. if we face another anti-government attack like the one we saw 15 years ago i think we could spiral out of the control. there could be a lot of civil unrest in this country for no reason. only because we in the media seem to focus on this. and i'm doing it
for america's leadership in the world. we lead in the financial sector. it's one of these parts in the economy we lead. but if people don't trust our market, we can't maintain that leadership. that's why this regulatory reform is not against wall street, it's fundamentally in the interest of the economy. wall street, though, has advanced beyond regulatory supervision and we need to catch up in a way that ensures we don't have the crisis we had in the past and we're prepared for fure ones. >> rose: banks have been lobbying hard against derivatives. >> yes, they have. >> rose: republicans have been up here raising money and talking about it. accusing the president of playing politics. conventional wisdom says the tough herself things are derivatives and consumer agency inside the federal reserve. >> that's two of them. but without a doubt those are in the top three or four issues. but here's... i don't want to have to just repeat what i said about the derivatives, but i take fit you look at this, this is an area that just a few years ago was a minor part of the market and when i say a few, the l
are there this morning. we'll have the latest coming up on "good morning america." >>> there has been another bizarre attack on children in china this morning. the third this week. a man attacked a group of kindergarten students with a hammer in eastern china. five children were injured. and then, he poured gasoline over his body and lit himself on fire. it was the fifth attack on schoolchildren in the last month. >>> a mine collapse in western kentucky has taken the lives of two miners. the men were found dead yet, about four miles from the surface. the mine where they were working has a long history of safety problems. it's been cited 840 times since january 2009. during that time, portions of the mine have been closed 11 times. >>> and in west virginia, the owners of the coal mine where 29 men died earlier this month, are offering each family a $3 million cash settlement. massey energy has also offered them a large insurance payout, family health coverage, and college payments for children. the families say taking the money will not bar them from legal action. >>> we know of president obama's firs
by and waiting. >> lama hasan in london this morning. thanks, lama. >>> later on "good morning america," we take a closer look at whether there is still a doing from that big volcano. >>> back here at home, big banks are gearing up for a battle over more government regulation. president obama and congressional lawmakers appear close to an agreement on a bill that would regulate the financial industry. t.j. winick is joining us from washington with the latest. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning. the president is determined to pass financial reform. and we're seeing the battle take shape on wall street and on capitol hill. when it comes to pushing financial reforms for wall street, the president sounds ready for a showdown. >> what we've seen is an army of industry lobbyists, from wall street, descending on capitol hill. if these folks want a fight, it's a fight i'm ready to have. >> reporter: the white house is focused on derivatives. essentially bets between power players on wall street and around the world, whether certain businesses will succeed or fail. >> part of what led to this c
piece in the "washington post" today. how america became a secular socialist machine. >> i think that is what the country is. the country is still a center right majority. if you look at washington, you talked about that a second ago, with harry reid. the health bill wasn't the first time reid decided to be totally partisan. the stimulus was. the reason i call it a machine, if you can get $787 billion out of congress, with no elected official having read the bill, that's not representative democracy. that's a machine. it's like chicago. when you watch how reid operates, anytime he has a choice between being left wing machine boss or participated in government, he picks being the left wing machine boss. secular and socialist are the other two words. i wrote in this part in reaction to colleague of mine who seemed surprise we used the word. if you look at the judges that obama is nominating, they tend to be rigid, anti-religious secularists. if you look at obama's policies we currently own most of general motors and own most of chrysler. aig is deeply in debt to the government. the
our viewers think about this. a question today is do you think america has fallen behind as we've -- joe has just said? we have. why do you think it's true when it comes to protecting the environment. e-mail us by logging on to cnn.com/hln and we're going to be checking out your views a little bit later. >>> now, take charge of your career. if you've been out of work for a few months and you do find a job, you are probably thrilled. good for you. but starting any new job is going to be hard and it's even harder after a long lay-off, so here's how to make a successful reentry back into the work force. "the wall street journal" says, one, read up about your industry. have your boss describe your job very specifically so you can get as ready as possible. then a few day s before your first day, go do a test run. see how long it's going to get you to shower, to get there, whether it's finding your way on the road or taking a subway so you're going to be on time and ready and confident on your first day. now, this one may be the hardest. don't make the same mistakes twice. now, maybe
as we were together on a bipartisan basis. to craft a realization designed to get america's lowest performing schools back on track. i will turn to my very capable partner in this perhapfor his og statement. >> thank you, mr. chairman, and thank you for your diligent work in moving this along on fixing "no child left behind." it is an old version and i'm sure we will have a new version here before long. we for to created thea diverse witness list and i look for to learning more from each of you this afternoon. the knowledge of practice to bring to the table will help us as we move forward to develop legislation that builds upon what we have learned from "no child left behind" and fixes what has not been working. two issues i will focus on as we read author is a -- we authorize this. first, the man didn't turn around models could have on a roll and frontier schools and school districts. the second is the research base used to determine whether these models have proven to be effective at turning around a performing schools. roll and frontier schools and school districts are unique an
of a criminal probe here. s&p equity cut it to a sell and bank of america and merrill lynch cut it to a neutral this morning and see it down another 7% and all the other financials are weak here, as well. they're also concerned about any criminal porobes of any kind. finally, massey energy, third company here involved in difficulties here. there are reports of criminal investigation, i say reports regarding that mine explosion in west virginia that happened about three weeks ago. all of this weighing on the market. people don't know exactly what's going on. good news follow up on the home builders. generally orders have been improving here. horton 55% improvement overall in the net orders. that's an excellent metric and generally they have been improving. ryland one of the companies only disappointing. chevron same story here. higher oil prices have helped the upstream production but good news in chemical and even, larry, refining is starting to get better and you know what a disaster that has been for a while. >> investors are digesting a lot of important economic data today, manufacturing, co
hopes and deferred dreams and obama as opposed racial america. facebook recently in washington for a little more than an hour. >> okay. my name is terry michael from the center of politics and journalism which is a very pleased to co-sponsor this event tonight. i have the honor of having brought robert pierre to washington under the politics and journalism semester program he was in the inaugural class and fall of 1989. we are now in the 22nd year with about 500 alumni and robert represents all of the alumni on the board of directors. he joined judy woodruff and mike mccurry and juan williams and a number of others who run why have to answer to the board of directors of the center. robert king to the program from louisiana state university. he was a junior and he went back to school and entered the school paper and then for a while he thought about getting a master's in business education, but the "washington post" saved him from the fate of personal wealth by recruiting him as a reporter for the post and now she labors under the slave wages of journalism. what's left of journa
of shocks me when there is no outcry in america to news stories like this one over the weekend. the u.s., the u.s. is preparing to pivot from domestic regulatory reform to push for a new tough international capital regime. what does that mean? oh, new international capital regime. that's a bubble government. you know, a new world order for your money. we're talking about the foundation of international financial regulations and global governing. hmm. what happens if i don't like that global government? how do i vote them out? where are all the taxes go? who is getting that tax money? it's a trial balloon, gang. and i can't believe how quiet it is. i mean when i was growing up, you were not that different. didn't we used to hate the idea -- didn't i remember reading some place about global government, really bad, like spooky bad? i'm not all for that global government thing. here in america this weekend, the response has been total silence. am i alone? i got up this morning i even heard the republicans were all for this one. wow! how does that happen? oh, i remember. it's the evil gree
is horrendous for america every day as retirees, students and middle-class-teams suffer, it is unbelievably good for bank profits. you have a rigged game in which all the money comes to you. of course, a portion of those ill-gotten profits do have to go to politicians and lobbyists. so that they can keep this legal. and that is the most formidable foe we face, america. 1500 wall street lobbyists as we speak, descending on washington to fight senator blanche lincoln's derivatives reform, simply because it calls for everything to be done in public. a transparent exchange, kind of like the stock market, it's crazy. fixing our financial system requires two things -- an actual plan to insure banks don't get too big to fail. and the courage to actually do it. join joining us now, republican senator, bob corker of tennessee, a member of the banking committee. senator corker, how do we end too big to fail, in your opinion? >> well, you've raised a lot of issues here, dylan, it's good to see you here on the camera. look, at the end of the day, one of the things i think you do have to have in place, is a
[inaudible] i was wondering with america just struggling to pay their bills, losing their jobs [inaudible] and fail to pay taxes on rental properties? [inaudible] nseries why are you such a disgrace? i have my tax returns. can i be free from other penalties? ♪ ♪ i want to introduce the next speaker a warrior here in washington, d.c. today in and day out is battling the injustice of the tax code. he formed the taxpayer protection pledge. he asked every candidate, every incumbent to sign it, reduce taxes this. he lives here in washington, d.c. but he is in part from washington, d.c. because he is a warrior who understands the tax code as well as anyone. i want you to give a big war round of applause for a fellow patriots, grover norquist from the americans for tax reform. [cheering] >> we have thousands of americans getting together today and over a thousand rallies in washington, d.c. and across america and it's not possible to thank all the people who took the time and effort to organize that but i would like to say special thank you to the three who did the most to make th
that is a foot in america today, judges who feel they have that power i believe of use the constitution, disrespect the constitution and if it is too deeply held it can actually disqualified them from sitting on the bench. i would note that prof. goodwin liu understands, i think, the importance of judicial philosophy in the confirmation policy when he opposed justice roberts'confirmation, issuing a statement that it is fair and essential to ask how a nominee, judge roberts, would interpret the constitution and its basic value. americans deserve real answers to this question and it should be a sensible focus of the confirmation process. he concluded that his disagreement was so severe that he advocated him not being confirmed in the senate. he testified in this committee to very aggressively oppose the confirmation of justice of the bill. madam chairman, we have a number of issues we want to talk about. i want to give the nominee a chance to respond fairly to the concerns of his failure to produce certain documents and records and so forth. he is entitled to that. i do believe that he di
're going to continue to focus on bringing jobs back to america and to our people. i yield back. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. madam speaker, i would say this. always the gentleman likes to talk about the prior administration, and i would just like to point out that during the prior administration, the last two years of that, his party was in control of congress and certainly if we look at the numbers, did contribute to some of the problem that -- mr. hoyer: would the gentleman yield on that issue? mr. cantor: i'm not ready to yield yet, madam speaker. i would say there's plenty of blame to go around. but what we're trying to do is learn from mistakes that have taken place and go forward in a constructive manner. it's my sense that this nation is at a crossroads. we have serious challenges facing this country and last thursday was congress' deadline for passing a budget. and it is my strong belief that we must act and the gentleman indicates that we are going to act, but because of the critical nature of the challenges that we face, madam speaker, i believe that we've got three reasons
the first lawsuit is filed. america has to find the intestinal fortitude to address this issue, starting in washington, because this could be a slippery slope. arizona passes it, then there's going to be more states passing it. tell how this leads to a better understanding of the racists in this country. it simply does not. people have a short fuse fast if the wrong situation is put upon them. tell me what you think in our telephone survey tonight. the number to dial is 1-877-ed-mns. my question tonight is, what is more harmful to america? cops who racially profile? or illegal immigration? press the number 1 for cops who profile, press the number 2 for illegal immigration. we'll bring you the results later on in the show. >>> joining me now, reverend al sharpton, president of national action network. reverend, good to have you with us tonight. >> thank you, ed. >> is this a step backwards from what you see on the surface? >> absolutely it is. i think it is absolutely an attempt to legalize racial profiling. i mean, all one has to do is imagine if there was a lawyer in maine or vermont sa
ignited a firestorm of controversy across america with copycat legislation on the way. the president put it this way -- >> you can imagine if you are hispanic-american in arizona, you're great grandparents may have been there before arizona was even a state. but now suddenly if you don't have your papers and you took your kid out to get ice cream, you're going to be harassed. that's something that could potentially happen. that's not the right way to go. >> you know, that sound bite really hit me. the magnitude of what the president just said. the president of the united states of america, just talked to people in a crowd saying you might be need something papers to stay legal in america. now the president is a constitutional scholar and a person of color. he is uniquely qualified and understands why this law is unamerican and racist. the story also has the attention of america's top law enforcement officials. he is attorney general mark holder. >> that law is an unfortunate one. i think that it is, i fear, subject to potential abuse and i'm very concerned about the wedge that it could d
." >> america the super power. but did you know america is also the world's super borrower? how long before debt undermines the economy. "where america stands" tonight on the "cbs evening news." on the "cbs evening news." it's all in the pepperation. come in now for baby back ribs. choose 1 of 10 freshly prepared entrées plus an appetizer for just $9.99. chili's. it's all in the pepperation. - gps: turn left ahead. - ...i mean left. woman: but gps changed our lives. turbotax does the same thing for our taxes. it answers tough questions in simple language, getting us to our maximum refund. guaranteed. announcer: try turbotax now. no way. covergirl has lightweight coverage just for your skin type. the new look of clean. for normal skin, oil control, and new clean for sensitive skin. so take off that mask and slip into lightweight coverage that really fits. ♪ it's makeup that works for you. -and you. -and you. 'cause it's made for you. clean makeup, in normal, oil control, and new sensitive. from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl. to talk about our new blueberry juice drinks. they're made with
, look those in new york's 21st district, including my own family, to the president's family, america stands next to poland in mourning. the solidarity of the polish people in their grief is an inspiration to us all. my thoughts and prayers are with the families who lost someone. thank you, mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? >> to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. defazio: the obama administration has steadfastly refused to contest the tariff of $2.4 billion levied by mexico because congress terminated the cross-border trucking program due to serious safety concerns. there is no drug testing in mexico. there are no hours of service requirements in mexico. there are no meaningful commercial driver's licenses issued in mexico to know what the record of these drivers are. congress overwhelmingly voted to terminate that program. but it's rumored the next month when the president of mexico comes, the obama administration will open the border to mexican trucks. jeopardizing the
, that number was 32,000 for every man, woman and child in america. that number has grown, a lot has changed over the year. >> dramatically. the deficits have almost gone up ten times, but it's important for people to understand that the threat to our future is not the short-term deficits, it's the deficits that will exist after the economy is recovered, after unemployment is down, after the wars are over, after we pass the crises. these so-called structural deficits threaten our future, both internationally and domestically, and we need to start doing something about it. >> we'll get to everyone else in a moment, but first let's rewind just a bit and pick up where we left off. >> in 2008, the national debt was $9.6 trillion. today it's almost 12.7 trillion, a 32% increase. that's nearly 41,000 for every american. and our budget deficits in national debt are only part of the problem. if you were to add up all of our nation's total liabilities and unfunded promises in social security, medicare and other programs, you would get over $62 trillion, 6 trillion more than in the fall of 2008. this
, thank you so much. i'll be back with final thoughts on this in a minute. somewhere in america... there's a home by the sea powered by the wind on the plains. there's a hospital where technology has a healing touch. there's a factory giving old industries new life. and there's a train that got a whole city moving again. somewhere in america, the toughest questions are answered every day. because somewhere in america, more than sixty thousand people spend every day answering them. siemens. answers. ♪ [ male announcer ] every business day, bank of america lends nearly $3 billion dollars to individuals, institutions, schools, organizations and businesses in every corner of the economy. america. ♪ growing stronger. every day. in the north of england to my new job at the refinery in the south. i'll never forget. it used one tank of petrol and i had to refill it twice with oil. a new car today has 95% lower emissions than in 1970. exxonmobil is working to improve cars, liners of tires, plastics which are lighter and advanced hydrogen technologies that could increase fuel efficiency by up
capitalism and put america back on top and also ut biz editor with economists and one of the smartest journalists around. thank you for joining us. appreciate it. straight to it. give me the directions to the road from ruin. >> the book is really about our capitalism failed. had lehman brothers went bust and the rest of the financial system went into meltdown, that was clear evidence that we couldn't carry on as before. capitalism was not supposed to involve the government coming in and bailing out all the bankers. so in the book we set out an agenda for reforming capitalism so that it can actually work better and serve the public rather than serve a small group of people on wall street and set out a number of idea, the, some in of the current reforms pushing, others are not. more fundamental. >> what of the president's reforms do you agree with and in your road map first? >> one of the ideas i like, set up a consumer protection agency. i wish it wasn't being set up with the federal reserve, but as an independent agency. >> why? >> because i think the banking industry did exploit the
. but it happens everywhere else in america as well. in fact, you know where significant differences have been found frequently suggest white yourts are more likely to engage in illegal drug dealing than black youth. but it'sçó been black youth, an particularly black young males that have been -- associated with the drug wars. there's excellent data that can be found through the sentencing project. the sentencing project based here in d.c. has done a fantastic job of analyzing and through its report the department of justice publish foff many of the reports that have been done by the sentencing project. >> calls. host: atlanta is first on our democrats line. you're on with michele alexander. she tess the author of "the new jim crow." caller: i found out the prisons and coups they are in and some of them moneys from the federal government and representatives that's determined by the census count, that count goes wards that. but they can't vote. how how do you get money for that prisoner and money's being allocated to their account. >> what you're referring to is the practice of the census bur
toen ploy meant and then there was little difference between the tp's and the rest of america. even with the obvious lack of liberals, the tp's represent the, quote, public at large. meaning they manage the hardware store and watch your house when you are on vacation. they probably hate rap music, but they hate "gossip girl." the fact that the tea partiers will stop calling tea partiers racist? of course not. the left feels the same way about america as they do about the tea partiers. if you have ever been stuck at a cocktail party in manhattan or san francisco, the party existed forever. but they were not called tea partiers yet. >> if you disagree with me, are you a racist homophobe who does not reuse shopping bags. >>> joe, every time white folks get together, the media yells racism. is that fair? >> no, when you refer to the tea parties as the tp's it is racist to native americans. >> i am so sorry. >> racist unfortunately has become a thing you say as a way of saying, be gone white person i disagree with. it is not fair with people with different opinions or people victim of ac
the highest calorie fast food in america? the health care bill will make sure you do. >>> and, perfect pitch. one little bird joins a singing planet, thanks to our "persons of the week." >>> good evening. and on this good friday, we begin with new jobs. the most robust jobs report in three years. 162,000 more people found work last month. and though the unemployment rate is stuck at 9.7%, the country is a far cry from what we saw one year ago, when nearly 780,000 people, that red bar, they were losing jobs every single month. and now, some jobs are back, and our business reporr bianna golodryga is here. she's been pouring over the numbers to el us who got them. >> reporter: good evening, diane. while the stock market was closed today in observation of good friday, odds are, had it been open, traders would have finished the week on a positive note. after two years of job losses, march proved to be a turning point. today's numbers say it all. america is back in business. the president said as much in a speech today at a factory in north carolina. >> the economy actually produced a substantial
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